Top 3 Food Production Jobs

The food industry is continuously growing which is why they are also in constant need of workers. When recession hit the economic world, the food industry survived from the perils of bankruptcy and closure. It’s because people need food in order to live and the demand for it continues to rise especially now that there are all sorts of new ingredients, high-tech equipment, and innovative food processing methods.
It’s good to know that there are many food production jobs to choose from especially if you happen to have a degree in culinary arts or business administration. You also improve your chances of getting hired if you hold years of relevant work experience and have undergone training. Among these jobs, the most popular are:

1. Food Production Service Jobs
If cooking is your passion, then this job is for you. You can work as an executive chef, line cook or short-order cook in a restaurant, hotel, diner, coffeehouse, or fast food chain. The job requires cooking, preparing the day’s menu, and working with the kitchen staff.

A fast-paced and challenging work environment awaits anyone who gets into these jobs. If you want to be an executive chef, you have to hold a 2-year or 4-year degree in culinary arts. However, for those aspiring to be a line cook or short-order cook, a high school diploma is enough. Chefs can earn as much as $66,000 a year while line cooks and short-order cooks earn an average of $24,000 annually.

2. Food Production Management Jobs
Food production managers have varied responsibilities depending on where they work and the nature of their job. For starters, you can work in a restaurant as a manager wherein you monitor other employees and perform other duties such as ordering supplies, keeping inventories, hiring and training workers, and many more.

Aside from restaurants, you can also manage food production in institutions like schools and hospitals. You help plan the menus and see to it that they meet the diets of consumers. You also see to it that cleanliness and orderliness are well-maintained. In addition, you supervise employers under you, handle complaints, and provide fast solutions to problems.

3. Factory Food Processing Jobs
Working in a food factory can be stressful but fun at the same time. Many factories hire food processors to help weigh raw foods, and process, package, and document their products effectively. The job isn’t strict about educational background but you have to be able to follow directions strictly and pay attention to details.

Under this job category, you may also apply as quality assurance manager as long as you hold a science-related degree. As manager, you’ll monitor other workers and ensure that food-processing standards are met.

If you think you can survive in these jobs, there’s no reason not to apply. They dynamic world of food production awaits you.

Food Inc Tells a Shocking Story About Our Food Production Industry!

The movie Food, Inc. brings attention to some major issues facing the U.S. food production system. Clever marketing and shiny packaging lead consumers to believe they are making healthy choices for themselves and their families, when really they may be eating chemicals and GMOs.

It also brings to light the issues of government subsidies making it cheaper to eat unhealthy processed foods rather than fresh whole foods. Food, Inc. makes one realize just how deceived consumers may be. You may think you are eating a healthy well balanced meal, when that food could in fact be just as detrimental to your health as fast food.

A chicken dinner with vegetable sides would easily be viewed as a healthy dinner option. The chicken however, was likely factory farmed. It was raised in inhumane conditions that facilitate the spread of disease. In the conditions of this type of meat production, once one animal is contaminated, many others are as well. Mass slaughterhouses provide that same problem.

It is also likely that chicken has been genetically modified from it’s natural construction to better suit consumers desires. The chicken that is most prominently available has been genetically modified to have more breast meat. These chickens grow faster than their bodies can keep up with. Often times they have trouble walking and their organs have trouble sustaining their oversized musculature. They are also given antibiotics, which their systems build up a resistance to, and as a result cannot fight disease. This leads to an unhealthy animal that is living in unhealthy conditions with hundreds of other chickens with the same problems cramped into one tiny living space. These are conditions for the perfect disease storm, being prepared for your kitchen table.

Your side of corn has likely been genetically modified too as well as showered with herbicide and pesticide. Seeds, which used to be public domain, are now being bought up my major agribusinesses and are being genetically modified to resist herbicides, and are being patented. These seeds and plants are called “Round-Up Ready.” Some of the health effects of genetic modification, herbicides, and pesticides are cancer, autism, and neurological disorders.

So while your meal may be nutritionally balanced, the production of this food can make your meal anything but nutritional for your body. It is always good to know where your food comes from and how it was produced, and to be vocal if you aren’t happy with what you’re being served. If you’re concerned and want to know more about ways to provide your family with healthier nutrition choices, this movie is a must see.

Marketing Food Products Online

Have you just gone through the whole process of getting your food product onto the market? In the traditional world, marketing food products has been cumbersome, time consuming and extremely expensive with many unknown outcomes of the efforts. Welcome to the 21st century of food marketing. The marketing your food online will allow you to reach a global or local audience in a matter of weeks. With the advent of social marketing, is an interactive playground, perfect to your food product the start it deserves.

This article will outline some of the most common methods of marketing online, examples how you can take advantage of them.

CPM Display advertising – CPM display advertising refers advertising to specific profiles and paying for per 1000 displays. As per traditional marketing, it’s extremely important you know where to find CPM networks that are related to the food industry and target the correct demographic profile for your product. For example, if your marketing a health food, you might want to target people aged 20 -30 years old.

Pay Per Click advertising – Pay Per Click or PPC is another method in online marketing where advertisers bid for keywords so each “click” a targeted user performs into your site. To create and efficient and effective campaign, a PPC expert can help you save time, effort and produce real results.

Search Engine Optimization – Depending on your food product, there are thousands of searches everyday that is related to your food product. Your website needs to be optimized so that search engines like Google, Yahoo and Bing can find your site and rank it appropriately for your target audience. However, don’t be fooled by this simple description, SEO requires cutting edge techniques to get you ahead. It would be ideal to hire an SEO specialist who works in the food industry, as they will already have data related to how other food products have faired in the online markets.

Social Networking: Social networking involves using sites such as Twitter, Facebook, MySpace to promote your product and get real live users interacting with your food product or company. Social networking is a powerful, powerful tool, but it can also be a double edged sword if you do not know what you are doing. If done properly, you could literally let millions of people on twitter about your food product, or get people to like your fan page to get more exposure. Your product could become the next big thing with Social Networking.

This article has outlined 4 powerful methods using online marketing to take your Food product to the next level. To obtain the full potential of online marketing you need experts in the field, ideally, a company who works only in the food industry as they will have all the resources, experience to get your food product to the masses. It’s important, especially in the food industry, that your first impression online is perfect. Don’t risk it by going it alone!

The Meaning Behind Food Product Dates and How Useful Are They to the Consumer

Except for infant formula and some baby food, product dating is not generally required by U.S. Federal regulations. There is also no universally accepted system used for food dating in the United States. Although dating of some foods is required by more than 20 states, there are areas of the U.S where much of the food supply has some type of date, and other areas where almost no food is dated.

Dates on packaged foods alert the consumer, the store and the manufacturer as to the quality of the food product. These dates are not safety dates and do not automatically mean the product is no longer safe or is spoiled in some way. After the date passes, the product should still be safe if it was handled properly, although the longer you keep it after that date, the greater possibility of spoilage.
If the package does have a date it will most likely have one of the following:

o “Sell-By” date tells the store the last day the product should be offered for sale. You should buy the product before the date expires and only hold it for two or three days beyond this date if it is well refrigerated.

o “Best if Used By (or Before)” and “Best Before End” date is directed at the consumer by the manufacture guaranteeing the best freshness, quality, flavor etc.

o “Use-By” date is directed at the consumer and is the last date recommended for use of the product while at peak quality. The date has been determined by the manufacturer, packer or distributor of the product.

o “Closed or coded dates” are packing numbers used by the manufacturer. These codes, which appear as a series of letters and/or numbers, might refer to the date or time of manufacture. They aren’t meant for the consumer to interpret as “use-by” dates. There is no book that tells how to translate the codes into dates.

o “Packed on” dates are sometimes found on canned and frozen food. This date indicates the packaging date and is generally not useful for the consumer.

o “Expiration” or “Exp” is the last date on which a product should be used – similar to the “Use By” date.

Even though products may still be useable after the date, I still recommend not purchasing or using any food product that has passed its “Use by'” or “Sell by” date. The manufacturer actually does not want you too either. They want you to continue purchasing their product and if you have a bad or less than expected experience then there is a good chance you are not going to buy that product again.

If you must use or consume the product for whatever reason, just examine the food closely, using all your senses in the following order (this is assuming the packaging is still intact and has not been damaged, dented or bloated in any way):

1. Does the product look good or normal? No abnormal colors, growth, fluids or coating of some unusual matter.

2. Does the product smell out of the ordinary or just spoiled?

3. If it passes the first 2 tests, then lastly taste a small portion (assuming the product is not a raw meat, poultry, seafood or other product that requires cooking first). Is there any out of the ordinary flavor or sharp or strong taste that is not normally present?

If any of these out of the ordinary characteristics are present, then by all means dispose of the product in a safe manner – wrapped up tightly for disposal so others will not be able to get to it.